Volunteer Projects are how we will log volunteer hours. Accurate logging of volunteer hours is critical for liability insurance and reporting to park management. CiviVolunteer uses “projects” to compartmentalize different kinds of volunteering. All volunteering information must be associated with a specific project.

To see all the active projects, go to Volunteers > Manage Volunteer Projects.

Create Volunteer Project to Log Hours

Contacts listed as “Owner” of a project will have control over editing and deleting the project.

Contacts listed as “Manager” will be BCC’d on all confirmation emails to volunteers who sign up. Add park rep and crew leaders here.

Beneficiary: This is the most important field for totaling volunteer hours. Always add JORBA using president@jorba.org email address. you should also add your park manager.

More Volunteer Project Info Below

Characteristics of a project
In addition to simple settings such as “Title” and “Description”, each project has the following characteristics:

  • Multiple volunteering opportunities: Within each project, you can define many different opportunities and assign contacts to those opportunities. In turn, each opportunity can be filled by multiple assignments to separate volunteers. Roles have been set up for; Trail Maintenance Volunteers, Trail Crew Managers to help to manage a trail crew and Trail Crew Leader, someone who leads, plans and manages trail events, usually the JORBA Park Rep or Coordinator.
  • Ongoing, or event-based: Projects, by themselves, do not have dates — so a simple project may be considered “ongoing”. If you wish to specify a time frame for a project, you can associate it with an event.
    • You will want to setup up an ongoing project to log all volunteer hours. e.g. a Jungle 2021 project to log all 2021 hours.
    • Event based projects are not yet available.
  • Active, or not: Projects can be marked as active or inactive. Only active projects will be displayed to potential volunteers. You may wish to keep a project inactive while it is still in the planning stages, or after it is completed.
  • Location: Specifies the physical location (as an address) where the volunteering will take place. The location is useful if potential volunteers want to know which projects are in their vicinity. Project locations are street based only, no lat long coordinates. Tip: It helps if you use the supplemental address as a descriptive label.
    • This is also where you list the phone and email address for volunteers to contact. Usually it’s the park rep or crew leader
  • Campaign: Projects can be associated with campaigns.
  • Multiple relationships to contacts: In order to control editing access and email notifications for each project, we must add relationships from the project to specific CiviCRM contacts.
    • Owner: Contacts listed as “Owner” of a project will have control over editing and deleting the project.
    • Manager: Contacts listed as “Manager” will be BCC’d on all confirmation emails sent by CiviCRM to volunteers who fill out the sign up form. Add park rep and crew leaders here.
    • Beneficiary: This is the most important field for totaling volunteer hours. Always add JORBA using president@jorba.org email address. you should also add your park manager. When activities are created for volunteering assignments, all contacts listed as “Beneficiary” of the volunteering project will be attached to these activities in the “With Contact” field. The beneficiary relationship can also be used to report the total number of hours volunteered for specific beneficiaries.
  • Multiple registration profiles: Specify which questions to ask volunteers when they sign up. You should be good leaving the default Volunteer Sign Up for individuals.
  • Volunteer Opportunities: After creating a project, you must define the volunteering opportunities associated with the project. An opportunity is essentially a role and a time, but with a few more options and nuances. To define opportunities, go to Volunteers > Manage Projects, find the project, and choose Define volunteer opportunities.
    • Role – to specify what type of work is to be done, for example “Trail Maintenance Volunteer”, or “Trail Crew Manager”
    • Number of volunteers needed – when this number is reached with enough assignments, no further assignments will be possible
    • Time – to specify when the volunteering is to occur (with the option of having it be open-ended)
      • Set Shift: Select this schedule type for a volunteer opportunity with a specific start time and duration. Example: Trail maintenance starts at 9:00 AM and lasts for two hours.
      • Flexible Timeframe: Select this schedule type for a volunteer opportunity with a specific duration but flexible dates. Example: I need a volunteer to complete trim back bushes sometime this month
      • Open-Ended: Select this schedule type for a volunteer opportunity with no time or duration constraints. This is most handy when bulk adding updating volunteer hours.
    • Public – to control which opportunities are available for self-service sign-up.
    • Enabled – to control which opportunities are available for assignment by managers of the project.
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